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Vintage Flashlights


GotaLight.net now has over 400 vintage flashlights, vintage lanterns, vintage candles and vintage battery operated lights to share with you! We also want to have some good information, some reliable resources and a few tips & tricks that might help you with any issues or questions you come across while collecting flashlights or lanterns. Just for fun, we have some old flashlight and battery ads here and there from back in the day. Plus 3 old catalogs, (2 by Eveready and one by Bond) showing some nice displays from back in the day. Hope you enjoy your visit and learn something new, find a new tip or see a flashlight you've never seen before.

NOTE >>> I never thought we would have this many galleries of flashlights and pages. It just keeps growing and growing each year! We now have 37 pages, I think, on Gotalight.net. One last thing. If anyone has any information, on any flashlights, feel free to share it not only with us, but for other collectors as well. As always, you will get the credit.

NOTE >>> I have a value price listed with most of my vintage flashlights in the galleries. I came up with some of these prices from the *Flashlight Museum website, *Stuart Schneider's Collecting Vintage Flashlights book and now the *Eveready Flashlight book by Bill Utley, (*prices are for excellent condition) and eBay, (what they sold for) and I add in my 2 cents. We always need to remember, worth over value.

The dates on my flashlights and lanterns come from other sources and may not be correct. Having a patent number, (the pat. number on the switch, could be only for the switch, same with the end cap, and maybe even the body) a serial number is always helpful, as is a dealer's catalog as for what year they came out. The rest is just guess work. Just like the Homart version of the redhead flashlight, with a center mount stand and red safety guard shown here. I would say it's from the 40's or 50's, and hard to find.

Now that I'm caught up on adding some more flashlights, which brings us to a total of 25 galleries! I will keep adding to the Show & Tell section month in and month out with new old flashlights. I keep asking myself... will this madness ever stop? Talk about the madness. I also have a small collection of LED flashlights! I like very bright lights up here in the mountains, I want to see what's looking at me from 100 yards away or more. NOT 30-50 feet! Some place in Ohio, there's a vintage flashlight collector shaking his head, as in... shame on me!

Besides the flashlight galleries I also have some interesting flashlights in our Show & Tell Section you might want to check out. I share some of my better finds with some information on the flashlights you won't read in the galleries. So step right in and see the longest flashlight in the world.... well maybe not the world, but, in my collection. Not a 5 cell, not a 7 cell, but a WOW factor cell.

In the Collectors Corner I have an on going list on what some of these vintage flashlights sell for and most sell for over the value price and some may surprise you?

If you have a special flashlight or lantern that does NOT work or looking for that battery pack that's no longer made. We have a resource for that in our Flashlight Repairs section. The flashlight 'Doctor' can help!

3 in 1 flashlights

Another interesting gallery is the 3 in 1 Flashlights. Some folks call these Search Lights, Railroad Signal Lights or 3 Way Lights. Steve Giterman put together a nice article on these interesting vintage collectibles. I just found another one that just might be the rarest and that brings the total up to ten 3 in 1 flashlights! NOTE: Anyone with any information on these lights, please send me an email or if you have one that is made by another company, let me know! If we use your information, you get the credit.

Donations gladly accepted. "Thank You to the good folks that have all ready donated a few flashlights".

The First Flashlight

With the major components in place, a company founded by Conrad Hubert, that would eventually become Eveready, produced the first commercial flashlights. These were handmade, constructed of simple paper and fiber tubes and used rough brass as a reflector. To introduce them to the public, they were first given to New York City police officers. After receiving a favorable impression from them, they gradually became better known and more widely used.

Little Flashlights

little vintage flashlights

Left to right we have some little flashlights made by Rayovac, unknown, Hipco, Bantam, Kwik-Lite and unknown. On the bottom we have an unknown, Auto-Met and one by Micro-Lite. All under 3 1/2 inches. All use 1 AA battery except the brass light, it uses 1 AAA battery.

The Lone Ranger

lone ranger ring flashlight

1949 or early 50's Lone Ranger Ring Flashlight. The bulb still works and the ring is in great condition. You could buy the ring flashlight using an order from found in General Mills cereals back in the 1950's.